5 future log spread ideas for your bullet journal

5 future log spread ideas for your bullet journal

Recently I wrote about my new love for bullet journaling, which detailed what a bullet journal is, and how to set one up.

The first collection in my bullet journal is my future log spread.

Ryder Carroll (the creator of the bullet journal) describes the function of the future log spread as follows:

“This Collection is used to store items that either need to be scheduled months in advance… or things that you want to get around to someday.”

As it’s nearly the start of a new year (I still can’t believe it!!), now’s the perfect time to start thinking about what future log spread you want in your 2018 bullet journal.

With this in mind, here’s five future log spread ideas to provide inspiration for your 2018 bullet journal.

  1. Official bullet journal spread

Future log official bullet journal spreadImage source

How does it work?
This is the layout Ryder Carroll suggests for your future log spread. I love how clean it is, plus it’s really simple to draw up.

Simply divide a double page into a maximum of 6 months, and list all your important dates for each month.

Pros

  • Super easy to use and draw up
  • Allows you to follow the official bullet journal layout

Cons

  • There’s very little space to list a lot of dates
  • Dates aren’t in chronological order
  1. Official bullet journal spread plus calendar

Future log official bullet journal spread plus calendarImage source

How does it work?
This is the design I use in my bullet journal (this image isn’t of my bullet journal though).

It works in the same way as the official bullet journal spread, but it also shows a calendar of the current month.

I use the calendar to get around the lack of space this layout has.

For example, I have certain chores that I do each month. I circle the dates that these chores need to be done on the calendar, and have a key at the end of my future log spread showing what the chores are.

By doing this, I don’t use the limited space to the right of the calendar for detailing recurring dates.

Pros

  • The addition of the calendar allows you to record recurring dates so you can utilise the lack of space to the right of the calendar better
  • You can see what days belong to what dates (if needed)

Cons

  • If using the calendar for recurring dates, you need to refer to a key to find out what the details of the date are
  • There’s still not a lot of space to the right of the calendar if you have a lot of important dates for a particular month
  1. A vertical layout

Future log a vertical layoutImage source

How does it work?
I really like this layout; it has elements of the official monthly spread (more on this soon), but in the form of a future log.

To draw up this layout divide a double page by four, then list the days of the month down each column. Once done start recording dates within their corresponding month.

Pros

  • Dates are listed chronologically
  • Allows you to block out dates. For example, in the above image a down arrow shows that a date goes over several days (e.g. a holiday).

Cons

  • There’s still not a lot of space if you have a lot of dates for a particular day
  • You can only see a maximum of four months at a time (any more months and there would be even less space)
  1. The Alastair Method

Future log the Alistair MethodImage source

How does it work?
Alastair Johnston created this design to streamline his future planning needs (more about this here).

To use this layout list as many months as you want to view on the page (this image shows four months) and divide them by lines.

When you’re ready to enter a date, put a dot in the column of the month that the date refers to, then write the date and its details to the right hand side.

Pros

  • You can view as many months as you want
  • Easy to draw up and use

Cons

  • Dates aren’t listed chronologically
  • The more months you have, the less space you have to write details
  1. A calendex

Future log a calendexImage source

How does it work?
Eddy Hope created this future log spread as a calendar/index hybrid. You can find out more here.

If you want to use a calendex for your future log spread, draw 12 columns (one for each month), then add horizontal lines to break up each week.

You will also have weekly or daily spreads in your journal (more about this soon). These spreads are where you will write details about each important date. When you’ve done this, go to your calendex, find the relevant date, and write the page number of the corresponding weekly or daily spread (where you’ve put the details about the date) in the relevant square.

Pros

  • Only takes up a double page
  • Dates are chronological

Cons

  • You have to refer to your weekly or daily spread to get more information on the date. If you don’t add weekly or daily spreads to your index, it may take some time to access the details of the date
  • It’s not as simple as the other layouts

Conclusion
Prior to writing this I didn’t know about the Alastair Method, and I’d seen the Calendex but didn’t know how it worked.

This just highlights the adaptability that the bullet journal has. There’s a solution to fit any need that you may have.

The best advice I have is to try what’s best for you, and if it doesn’t work try something else.

And if in doubt on what layout to use, there are so many fantastic ideas on Instagram and Pinterest.

If you have any ideas for a future log spread, or want to know more about how to find inspiration I’d love to hear from you.

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